Fracking in Yorkshire

It is a bit of a side effect of democracy, that leads a company to pay millions of pounds to the Treasury for the licence to frack, only to find that they are thwarted by local planners who decide that they cannot.

This seems to what is happening everywhere, and both Cuadrilla and Third Energy seem to be suffering form the same problem.
Cuadrilla have managed to find some Pro Frackers to help them, which is good, as it has always struck me as the quiet majority seem to be in favour of fracking, and the noisy minority against it:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lancashire-35522919

To quote the anti frackers:

Jasber Singh, from Frack Free Lancashire, said: “We are not going to gain anything from fracking apart from air, noise, land and water pollution that’s bad for our health and the health of the climate.”

Err Jasper, wake up. Over at Kirkby Misperton in Yorkshire, the locals are set to get a load of cash into the local economy. The gas is set to be piped directly into  the Knapton Generating Station.
They have the environment backing too:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-36017772

Just not the planners.

I cannot help feeling that The anti Frackers are not doing Lancashire any favours. Lancashire needs more money.  Where else is it likely to come from?  Central Government? Only if they can tax enough business’s, and with retail tax going off shore (BHS and Austin Reed join the Fallen this week) Amazon, Google and the big coffee houses seeming to be the big expanding businesses, I cannot help but feel that a boost from Gas would help the country coffers right now too.

The Process of Extracting Shale Gas

Shale gas extraction is a sophisticated process, involving a large volume of skilled and experienced labour, specialist suppliers and costly capital equipment.

This report provides a very basic summary of the procedures and timelines
involved in drilling, fracturing and then harvesting shale gas. The process will differ to some extent between an exploration well and full commercial extraction, although the basic principles remain the same. We comment on these differences below, which revolve primarily on the degree of testing and analysis that is required and amount of fracturing.